The Deers Ears

infinity-imagined:

The Southern Pinwheel Galaxy

(Source: spacetelescope.org, via likeaphysicist)

science-illustrated:

The Magnetosphere, as a results of the electromagnetic force, one of the four fundamental forces of the universe, is produced by convection currents in the outer liquid of Earth’s core. Basically, the Earth is like a giant magnet, with its two poles (the magnetic dipole) which differ slightly from the geographic poles.

This magnetic field is preventing the Earth from being blasted by solar winds, a stream of charged particles emanating from the Sun. Mars, as Venus, doesn’t have a magnetosphere. Therefore the planet isn’t protected against the harmful cosmic radiation and suffer a strong atmosphere erosion. The radiation on Mars ranges around 200 mSv/year, which is is 100 time more than Earth’s average!

You can see others illustrations i made for in this project here (in french sorry!)

(via mindblowingscience)

house-of-gnar:

house-of-gnar:

Various SEM photos of Ebola | NIAID on Flickr

  • (1) Colorized scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles (blue) budding from a chronically infected VERO E6 cell (yellow-green).
  • (2) Scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles budding from a single chronically-infected VERO E6 cell (25,000x magnification). 
  • (3) Colorized scanning electron micrograph of filamentousEbola virus particles (green) attached to and budding froma chronically infected VERO E6 cell (blue) (25,000x magnification). 
  • (4) Scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles attached and budding from chronically infected VERO E6 cells (15,000x magnification).
  • (5) Scanning electron micrograph of Ebola virus budding from the surface of a Vero cell (African green monkey kidney epithelial cell line.)

WHO : Ebola death toll in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leon, passes 3,000 (3083).

(via mindblowingscience)

supersonicart:

Brooks Salzwedel, New Works.

A series of brand new works of art by Brooks Salzwedel (Previously on Supersonic) entitled “Natl. Parks" which are on view at George Billis Gallery in Los Angeles, California until November 1st.  Brooks creates his work with vellum and resin to create a three dimensional work of art of phantom like landscapes, some of which are based on real locations and other imaginary.  You can see more of the haunting but beautiful work below.

Read More

(Source: supersonciart.com)

post-mitotic:

stapes, the stirrup of our auditory system and one of the three middle ear bones responsible for transmitting sound to the oval window
colored SEM
credit: Steve Gschmeissner

post-mitotic:

stapes, the stirrup of our auditory system and one of the three middle ear bones responsible for transmitting sound to the oval window

colored SEM

credit: Steve Gschmeissner

(via andybrwn)

nubbsgalore:

male mouthbrooding jawfish — such as the mottled (seen in the fourth photo with spikes on the side of its head from a fireworm attack), the yellowhead, the banded, and the cardinalfish seen here —  use their mouths to protect their eggs until the fry hatch. 

mouthbrooding fish are able to produce smaller numbers of offspring with a higher chance of survival than species that offer no broodcare. the males, however, are not able to eat during this period of incubation (which can last anywhere from one to three weeks), but will open their mouths, spitting the eggs out and then sucking them back in to keep them clean and aerated. 

photos by (click pic) nicolas terryshigeru harazaki, steven kovacs, keri wilk, michael patrick oneilll and marcello di francesco 

(via ecophys)

sarahsaysmd:

In med school, taking notes is hard because there’s SO much material. I remember going through one of my lectures and wondering how the hell I was going to simplify it to something I could actually remember. I usually make what are called “study sheets” after each lecture, and this is how I do them!

  • If there’s learning objectives, follow those. Use them to guide your notes. If there’s not, then use your intuition (based on what was heavily emphasized or covered the most) to figure out where to focus your notetaking. Just make sure you’ve organized everything in your head before putting it down to paper, because notes only work if they’re clear! 
  • Use categories to break up your learning. In one lecture there’s often multiple components, so I use headings to separate the main points. That way they don’t all blur together in my head.
  • Whenever possible, make charts, diagrams, or drawings. I can’t tell you the amount of times I’ve remembered something on a test because I took the time to draw it out! If you’re a kinesthetic or visual learner, this is super helpful. It really simplifies the material and organizes it thoroughly. It’s much easier to study from a clear chart than a block of text.
  • When you do use text, keep it concise. Use different colors to write out key phrases and terms, and try not to write out paragraphs and paragraphs. Sometimes, it unavoidable, and you need a lot of text to understand a key concept. Short and sweet wherever possible, though, makes life easier for you! 
  • Transform, transform, transform. Always try to put things in your own words wherever you can. Manipulate the material so that it coincides with what you’ve learned. When you think about a topic from multiple perspectives, you understand it a million times better.
  • When reviewing notes, read them aloud! Sometimes, I cover up one section and say everything I can remember about it. Then I check to see if I missed anything. It’s a great way to review (might be awkward if you have roommates, but mine is used to my impromptu lectures by now!). 

(via thisfuturemd)

staceythinx:

Martin Bailey’s beautiful photos of icebergs are a powerful reminder of what we need to protect

(Source: neatorama.com, via andybrwn)

marine-science:

Methods of coral restoration are being applied in many parts of the world, including Florida, Mozambique and the Caribbean islands. Fast growing, branching species are being reared by conservationists and scientists and used for “reef seeding” projects. 

"It sounds quite novel, but in fact its a science thats been around for about 30 years. One of the reasons why I’m drawn to it is because its a very active way to get people physically involved in protecting the ocean."

Photo credits: top, middle, second from bottom, bottom

(via sagansense)

brains-and-bodies:

From Daily Anatomy







Incredible view of the Corpus callosum! "The cerebral hemispheres are divided right down the middle into a right hemisphere and a left hemisphere. Each hemisphere appears to be specialized for some behaviors.The hemispheres communicate with each other through a thick band of 200-250 million nerve fibers called the corpus callosum. (A smaller band of nerve fibers called the anterior commissure also connects parts of the cerebral hemispheres.)It connects the left and right sides of the brain allowing for communication between both hemispheres. The corpus callosum transfers motor, sensory, and cognitive information between the brain hemispheres.As a last resort, the corpus callosum can be severed so that communication between the cerebral hemispheres is interrupted in cases of severe intractable epilepsy, but of course you can imagine that this is accompanied by strong neuropathological symptoms!”Image found on bobschuster.com
 

brains-and-bodies:

From Daily Anatomy

Incredible view of the Corpus callosum! 

"The cerebral hemispheres are divided right down the middle into a right hemisphere and a left hemisphere. Each hemisphere appears to be specialized for some behaviors.

The hemispheres communicate with each other through a thick band of 200-250 million nerve fibers called the corpus callosum. (A smaller band of nerve fibers called the anterior commissure also connects parts of the cerebral hemispheres.)

It connects the left and right sides of the brain allowing for communication between both hemispheres. The corpus callosum transfers motor, sensory, and cognitive information between the brain hemispheres.

As a last resort, the corpus callosum can be severed so that communication between the cerebral hemispheres is interrupted in cases of severe intractable epilepsy, but of course you can imagine that this is accompanied by strong neuropathological symptoms!”

Image found on bobschuster.com
 

(via thisfuturemd)