The Deers Ears

capturedphotos:

It’s All So Far Away
Standing alone in the middle of the dark empty space
A cool steady breeze blowing from the North
The Milky Way shining brightly to the South
You realize you are but a mere speck of life in this vast Universe
You better make it count.
Photo taken in Cedar Key, Florida.
Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil 

capturedphotos:

It’s All So Far Away

Standing alone in the middle of the dark empty space

A cool steady breeze blowing from the North

The Milky Way shining brightly to the South

You realize you are but a mere speck of life in this vast Universe

You better make it count.

Photo taken in Cedar Key, Florida.

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil 

(via sagansense)

“I have noticed that even people who claim everything is predetermined and that we can do nothing to change it, look before they cross the road.”

—   Stephen Hawking (via liberatingreality)

(via sagansense)

ipayrenttothedunya:

Because it needed to be said.

(via shychemist)

descentintotyranny:

Holocaust survivors and their descendants accuse Israel of ‘genocide’ 
More than 300 Holocaust survivors and their descendants have condemned what they described as Israel’s ‘genocide of Palestinian people’ in an advert in the New York Times
Aug. 24 2014

Dozens of Holocaust survivors, together with hundreds of descendants of Holocaust survivors and victims, have accused Israel of “genocide” for the deaths of more than 2,000 Palestinians in Gaza since the conflict erupted in July.


In an open letter released by the International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network and published as an advert in The New York Times, the group calls for a full economic, cultural and academic boycott of Israel over its “wholesale effort to destroy Gaza”.
“Genocide begins with the silence of the world,” the statement reads, “We must raise our collective voices and use our collective power to bring about an end to all forms of racism, including the ongoing genocide of Palestinian people.”
The statement also condemns the United States for its financial and diplomatic support of Israel.
The signatories express alarm at “the extreme, racist dehumanization of Palestinians in Israeli society, which has reached a fever pitch.”
This condemnation was designed as a response to a widely-published advertisement from Nobel prize-winning author Elie Wiesel that condemned Hamas for its “use of children as human shields”.
The statement reads: “We are disgusted and outraged by Elie Wiesel’s abuse of our history […] to justify the unjustifiable.”
Of the 327 signatories, 40 survived the Holocaust and the other 287 are descendants of Holocaust survivors or victims.
Recent today reports refer to the destruction of an high rise office building in the southern town of Rafah, and the bombing of an apartment building in Gaza City amid attempts from the Egyptian government to establish a durable ceasefire.
More than 2,100 Palestinians, including 500 children have been killed in the conflict, according to Palestinian health officials and UN figures. Israel has lost 64 soldiers and four civilians.

descentintotyranny:

Holocaust survivors and their descendants accuse Israel of ‘genocide’

More than 300 Holocaust survivors and their descendants have condemned what they described as Israel’s ‘genocide of Palestinian people’ in an advert in the New York Times

Aug. 24 2014

Dozens of Holocaust survivors, together with hundreds of descendants of Holocaust survivors and victims, have accused Israel of “genocide” for the deaths of more than 2,000 Palestinians in Gaza since the conflict erupted in July.

In an open letter released by the International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network and published as an advert in The New York Times, the group calls for a full economic, cultural and academic boycott of Israel over its “wholesale effort to destroy Gaza”.

“Genocide begins with the silence of the world,” the statement reads, “We must raise our collective voices and use our collective power to bring about an end to all forms of racism, including the ongoing genocide of Palestinian people.”

The statement also condemns the United States for its financial and diplomatic support of Israel.

The signatories express alarm at “the extreme, racist dehumanization of Palestinians in Israeli society, which has reached a fever pitch.”

This condemnation was designed as a response to a widely-published advertisement from Nobel prize-winning author Elie Wiesel that condemned Hamas for its “use of children as human shields”.

The statement reads: “We are disgusted and outraged by Elie Wiesel’s abuse of our history […] to justify the unjustifiable.”

Of the 327 signatories, 40 survived the Holocaust and the other 287 are descendants of Holocaust survivors or victims.

Recent today reports refer to the destruction of an high rise office building in the southern town of Rafah, and the bombing of an apartment building in Gaza City amid attempts from the Egyptian government to establish a durable ceasefire.

More than 2,100 Palestinians, including 500 children have been killed in the conflict, according to Palestinian health officials and UN figures. Israel has lost 64 soldiers and four civilians.

(via shychemist)

neurosciencestuff:

Researchers find new target for chronic pain treatment
Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found a new target for treating chronic pain: an enzyme called PIP5K1C. In a paper published today in the journal Neuron, a team of researchers led by Mark Zylka, PhD, Associate Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, shows that PIP5K1C controls the activity of cellular receptors that signal pain.
By reducing the level of the enzyme, researchers showed that the levels of a crucial lipid called PIP2 in pain-sensing neurons is also lessened, thus decreasing pain.
They also found a compound that could dampen the activity of PIP5K1C. This compound, currently named UNC3230, could lead to a new kind of pain reliever for the more than 100 million people who suffer from chronic pain in the United States alone.
In particular, the researchers showed that the compound might be able to significantly reduce inflammatory pain, such as arthritis, as well as neuropathic pain – damage to nerve fibers. The latter is common in conditions such as shingles, back pain, or when bodily extremities become numb due to side effects of chemotherapy or diseases such as diabetes.
The creation of such bodily pain might seem simple, but at the cellular level it’s quite complex. When we’re injured, a diverse mixture of chemicals is released, and these chemicals cause pain by acting on an equally diverse group of receptors on the surface of pain-sensing neurons.
“A big problem in our field is that it is impractical to block each of these receptors with a mixture of drugs,” said Zylka, the senior author of the Neuron article and member of the UNC Neuroscience Center. “So we looked for commonalities – things that each of these receptors need in order to send a signal.” Zylka’s team found that the lipid PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate) was one of these commonalities.
“So the question became: how do we alter PIP2 levels in the neurons that sense pain?” Zylka said. “If we could lower the level of PIP2, we could get these receptors to signal less effectively. Then, in theory, we could reduce pain.”
Many different kinases can generate PIP2 in the body.  Brittany Wright, a graduate student in Zylka’s lab, found that the PIP5K1C kinase was expressed at the highest level in sensory neurons compared to other related kinases. Then the researchers used a mouse model to show that PIP5K1C was responsible for generating at least half of all PIP2 in these neurons.
“That told us that a 50 percent reduction in the levels of PIP5K1C was sufficient to reduce PIP2 levels in the tissue we were interested in – where pain-sensing neurons are located” Zylka said. “That’s what we wanted to do – block signaling at this first relay in the pain pathway.”
Once Zylka and colleagues realized that they could reduce PIP2 in sensory neurons by targeting PIP5K1C, they teamed up with Stephen Frye, PhD, the Director of the Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.
They screened about 5,000 small molecules to identify compounds that might block PIP5K1C. There were a number of hits, but UNC3230 was the strongest. It turned out that Zylka, Frye, and their team members had come upon a drug candidate. They realized that the chemical structure of UNC3230 could be manipulated to potentially turn it into an even better inhibitor of PIP5K1C. Experiments to do so are now underway at UNC.

neurosciencestuff:

Researchers find new target for chronic pain treatment

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found a new target for treating chronic pain: an enzyme called PIP5K1C. In a paper published today in the journal Neuron, a team of researchers led by Mark Zylka, PhD, Associate Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, shows that PIP5K1C controls the activity of cellular receptors that signal pain.

By reducing the level of the enzyme, researchers showed that the levels of a crucial lipid called PIPin pain-sensing neurons is also lessened, thus decreasing pain.

They also found a compound that could dampen the activity of PIP5K1C. This compound, currently named UNC3230, could lead to a new kind of pain reliever for the more than 100 million people who suffer from chronic pain in the United States alone.

In particular, the researchers showed that the compound might be able to significantly reduce inflammatory pain, such as arthritis, as well as neuropathic pain – damage to nerve fibers. The latter is common in conditions such as shingles, back pain, or when bodily extremities become numb due to side effects of chemotherapy or diseases such as diabetes.

The creation of such bodily pain might seem simple, but at the cellular level it’s quite complex. When we’re injured, a diverse mixture of chemicals is released, and these chemicals cause pain by acting on an equally diverse group of receptors on the surface of pain-sensing neurons.

“A big problem in our field is that it is impractical to block each of these receptors with a mixture of drugs,” said Zylka, the senior author of the Neuron article and member of the UNC Neuroscience Center. “So we looked for commonalities – things that each of these receptors need in order to send a signal.” Zylka’s team found that the lipid PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate) was one of these commonalities.

“So the question became: how do we alter PIP2 levels in the neurons that sense pain?” Zylka said. “If we could lower the level of PIP2, we could get these receptors to signal less effectively. Then, in theory, we could reduce pain.”

Many different kinases can generate PIP2 in the body.  Brittany Wright, a graduate student in Zylka’s lab, found that the PIP5K1C kinase was expressed at the highest level in sensory neurons compared to other related kinases. Then the researchers used a mouse model to show that PIP5K1C was responsible for generating at least half of all PIP2 in these neurons.

“That told us that a 50 percent reduction in the levels of PIP5K1C was sufficient to reduce PIP2 levels in the tissue we were interested in – where pain-sensing neurons are located” Zylka said. “That’s what we wanted to do – block signaling at this first relay in the pain pathway.”

Once Zylka and colleagues realized that they could reduce PIP2 in sensory neurons by targeting PIP5K1C, they teamed up with Stephen Frye, PhD, the Director of the Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

They screened about 5,000 small molecules to identify compounds that might block PIP5K1C. There were a number of hits, but UNC3230 was the strongest. It turned out that Zylka, Frye, and their team members had come upon a drug candidate. They realized that the chemical structure of UNC3230 could be manipulated to potentially turn it into an even better inhibitor of PIP5K1C. Experiments to do so are now underway at UNC.

(via brains-and-bodies)

sixpenceee:

Informal infographic depicting evolution 

(via sagansense)

learn2anarchy:

whoisbenjacoby:

dynastylnoire:

1109-83:

funkymonkey-boy:

 ”A product of U.S. Army-sanctioned mass slaughter of American bison in the 1800s, these bison skulls are waiting to be ground for fertilizer, most likely in the American midwest. The slaughter was so effective that the population of bison in the U.S. is estimated to have dropped from around 60 million in 1800 to as few as 750 in 1890.”
They were slaughtered as part of a U.S. Government Policy to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there.

"…to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there."

America has been stuck on genocide ever since white people landed here.

I’m about to cry right now.

The genocide wasn’t limited to human beings.

learn2anarchy:

whoisbenjacoby:

dynastylnoire:

1109-83:

funkymonkey-boy:

 ”A product of U.S. Army-sanctioned mass slaughter of American bison in the 1800s, these bison skulls are waiting to be ground for fertilizer, most likely in the American midwest. The slaughter was so effective that the population of bison in the U.S. is estimated to have dropped from around 60 million in 1800 to as few as 750 in 1890.”

They were slaughtered as part of a U.S. Government Policy to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there.

"…to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there."

America has been stuck on genocide ever since white people landed here.

I’m about to cry right now.

The genocide wasn’t limited to human beings.

(Source: the-big-bamboo, via shychemist)

queermobile:

amorphe:

 
heracliteanfire:

‘Phengodidae Sp. The beetle family Phengodidae is known also as glowworm beetles, whose larvae are known as glowworms.’ (via Project Noah)


who did her hair like this

queermobile:

amorphe:

 

heracliteanfire:

‘Phengodidae Sp. The beetle family Phengodidae is known also as glowworm beetles, whose larvae are known as glowworms.’ (via Project Noah)

who did her hair like this

(via mollisaurus)

snarkbender:

Sherman Alexie on his new film (thedailybeast.com)

Sites to look for free textbooks

un-bylined:

Textbooknova 

Reddit

Bookboon 

Textbookrevolution 

GaTech Math Textbooks

Ebookee 

Freebookspot 

Free-ebooks

Getfreeebooks 

BookFinder

Oerconsortium 

Project Gutenberg

(Source: unbylined, via ladytatyana)