The Deers Ears

cross-connect:

NeSpoon is a street artist from Warsaw, Poland. Her artistic focus is on the intricate patterns of lace, and breaking its granny stereotype by using it to beautify gritty urban spaces. NeSpoon calls her artistic approach the “jewellery of the public space”:

Jewellery makes people look pretty, my public jewellery has the same goal, make public places look better.

NeSpoon often uses the usual spray paint and stencils of enlarged lace patterns to produce her works on the street via

artist find at Lustik

(via andybrwn)

the-actual-universe:

Cosmic bacon? 
Perhaps I just have a huge passion for breakfast meat, but the stripes in this new Europa image seem to resemble a popular breakfast food. The colored image we see here is the end result of clear-filter grayscale data collected from NASA’s Galileo spacecraft added to low-resolution color data taken from a separate orbit of Galileo’s. The blue-white areas indicate terrain that is almost pure water ice, while the reddish regions contain water mixed with hydrated salts such as magnesium sulfate or possibly sulfuric acid. The reddish sections are connected with the “bacon” stripe, indicating the possibility that these surface features could have been in contact with a global subsurface oceanic layer during and/or after their formation. The area shown in the image spans approximately 101 x 103 miles (163 x 167 km). The original grayscale data was collected by Galileo on November 6, 1997 while performing the vehicle’s 11th orbit of Jupiter. At the time the data was collected, Galileo was roughly 13,237 miles (21,700 km) from Europa. This data was combined with the lower-res data in 1998 during the 14th orbit of Jupiter and at a distance of 89,000 miles (143,000 km) from Europa. 
Source & Image Credit: NASA

the-actual-universe:

Cosmic bacon? 

Perhaps I just have a huge passion for breakfast meat, but the stripes in this new Europa image seem to resemble a popular breakfast food. The colored image we see here is the end result of clear-filter grayscale data collected from NASA’s Galileo spacecraft added to low-resolution color data taken from a separate orbit of Galileo’s. 

The blue-white areas indicate terrain that is almost pure water ice, while the reddish regions contain water mixed with hydrated salts such as magnesium sulfate or possibly sulfuric acid. The reddish sections are connected with the “bacon” stripe, indicating the possibility that these surface features could have been in contact with a global subsurface oceanic layer during and/or after their formation. 

The area shown in the image spans approximately 101 x 103 miles (163 x 167 km). The original grayscale data was collected by Galileo on November 6, 1997 while performing the vehicle’s 11th orbit of Jupiter. At the time the data was collected, Galileo was roughly 13,237 miles (21,700 km) from Europa. This data was combined with the lower-res data in 1998 during the 14th orbit of Jupiter and at a distance of 89,000 miles (143,000 km) from Europa. 

Source & Image Credit: NASA

imveryinterested:

jedavu:

Intriguing Photographs Of Partially Submerged Nudes That Play With Perception

Sydney-based photographer Danny Eastwood has a visually intriguing series titled ‘The Naked and the Nude’ that plays with perception. 

These are incredible!

(via electricsexdoll)

humanoidhistory:

Sailors walking a blimp out of a hangar on the North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, California, circa 1920.

humanoidhistory:

Sailors walking a blimp out of a hangar on the North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, California, circa 1920.

scienceyoucanlove:

Fact of the Day:The giant squid, or Architeuthis dux as it’s scientifically known, has a complex yet small donut-shaped brain. The squid’s oesophagus runs through the ‘donut-hole’ of the brain making it essential for food to be ground into small pieces by it’s notorious beak.Read more about this fascinating creature herewww.ocean.si.edu/giant-squid (Graphic via funnyjunk.com)
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Fact of the Day:
The giant squid, or Architeuthis dux as it’s scientifically known, has a complex yet small donut-shaped brain. The squid’s oesophagus runs through the ‘donut-hole’ of the brain making it essential for food to be ground into small pieces by it’s notorious beak.
Read more about this fascinating creature herewww.ocean.si.edu/giant-squid 
(Graphic via funnyjunk.com)

source 

scienceyoucanlove:

World’s Largest Freshwater Turtle Nearly Extinct
The last known pair of Yangtze giant softshell turtles mated again in June.
Kaitlin Solimine
for National Geographic
PUBLISHED JULY 1, 2013

The fate of a species is resting on the shells of two turtles at China's Suzhou Zoo.
n June, researchers collected eggs from the last mating pair of the critically endangered Yangtze giant softshell turtle (Rafetus swinhoei) in the hopes that at least one will be fertile.
The 220-pound (100-kilogram) freshwater giant, which spends most of its life burrowing in mud, was once common in its namesake Yangtze River, China’s Lake Taihu and Yunnan Province, and parts of Vietnam.
By the late 1990s, however, human encroachment and poaching for use of the shells in Chinese traditional medicine rapidly depleted the population. Now, a total of four animals are known—two wild males in Vietnam and the mating pair at Suzhou Zoo.
It’s the team’s sixth year of breeding the turtles at the zoo, which is not far from Shanghai. So far, none of the eggs have hatched.
Researchers can’t pinpoint the reason for the infertility, but they suspect a combination of factors, including poor sperm quality due to the male’s age—roughly a hundred—an improper mating posture, and stress on the female.
Because the turtles are the last in captivity and too much human interaction could kill them, sperm samples cannot be taken nor tests run. Still, scientists are hoping that this year will be the lucky one. (Related: "Pictures: Turtles Hunted, Traded, Squeezed Out of Their Habitats.")
"The resurrection of this iconic species in the wild, the largest freshwater turtle in the world, would be a symbol of hope," said Gerald Kuchling, founder of the Australia-based group Turtle Conservancyand a turtle-reproduction expert.
"Miraculous" Find
As is the case with many near-extinct species, by the time scientists realized the extent of the turtle’s decline, the species was almost gone.
In 2006, the U.S. nonprofit Turtle Survival Alliance asked Kuchling to establish the sex of the last three captive giant softshell turtles in China, which at the time lived at the Shanghai Zoo, Suzhou Zoo, and Suzhou’s West Garden Buddhist Temple. (Related: “6 of Nature’s Loneliest Animals Looking for Love.”)
When Kuchling landed in China in 2007, the Shanghai Zoo and Buddhist Temple individuals had already died. The Suzhou Zoo male was the last known Chinese survivor. Researchers sent an all-points bulletin to every zoo in the nation in the off chance a turtle had been misidentified.
Their call was answered: A photograph of a turtle at the Changsha Zoo looked promising. Kuchling, along with Lu Shunqing, China director for the Wildlife Conservation Society, traveled to Changsha, where they confirmed it was a Yangtze giant softshell—and a female to boot.
"It’s a bit miraculous we found her," said Emily King, the Suzhou Zoo breeding program’s field assistant.
read more from NatGeo 

scienceyoucanlove:

World’s Largest Freshwater Turtle Nearly Extinct

The last known pair of Yangtze giant softshell turtles mated again in June.

Kaitlin Solimine

for National Geographic

PUBLISHED JULY 1, 2013

The fate of a species is resting on the shells of two turtles at China's Suzhou Zoo.

n June, researchers collected eggs from the last mating pair of the critically endangered Yangtze giant softshell turtle (Rafetus swinhoei) in the hopes that at least one will be fertile.

The 220-pound (100-kilogram) freshwater giant, which spends most of its life burrowing in mud, was once common in its namesake Yangtze River, China’s Lake Taihu and Yunnan Province, and parts of Vietnam.

By the late 1990s, however, human encroachment and poaching for use of the shells in Chinese traditional medicine rapidly depleted the population. Now, a total of four animals are known—two wild males in Vietnam and the mating pair at Suzhou Zoo.

It’s the team’s sixth year of breeding the turtles at the zoo, which is not far from Shanghai. So far, none of the eggs have hatched.

Researchers can’t pinpoint the reason for the infertility, but they suspect a combination of factors, including poor sperm quality due to the male’s age—roughly a hundred—an improper mating posture, and stress on the female.

Because the turtles are the last in captivity and too much human interaction could kill them, sperm samples cannot be taken nor tests run. Still, scientists are hoping that this year will be the lucky one. (Related: "Pictures: Turtles Hunted, Traded, Squeezed Out of Their Habitats.")

"The resurrection of this iconic species in the wild, the largest freshwater turtle in the world, would be a symbol of hope," said Gerald Kuchling, founder of the Australia-based group Turtle Conservancyand a turtle-reproduction expert.

"Miraculous" Find

As is the case with many near-extinct species, by the time scientists realized the extent of the turtle’s decline, the species was almost gone.

In 2006, the U.S. nonprofit Turtle Survival Alliance asked Kuchling to establish the sex of the last three captive giant softshell turtles in China, which at the time lived at the Shanghai Zoo, Suzhou Zoo, and Suzhou’s West Garden Buddhist Temple. (Related: “6 of Nature’s Loneliest Animals Looking for Love.”)

When Kuchling landed in China in 2007, the Shanghai Zoo and Buddhist Temple individuals had already died. The Suzhou Zoo male was the last known Chinese survivor. Researchers sent an all-points bulletin to every zoo in the nation in the off chance a turtle had been misidentified.

Their call was answered: A photograph of a turtle at the Changsha Zoo looked promising. Kuchling, along with Lu Shunqing, China director for the Wildlife Conservation Society, traveled to Changsha, where they confirmed it was a Yangtze giant softshell—and a female to boot.

"It’s a bit miraculous we found her," said Emily King, the Suzhou Zoo breeding program’s field assistant.

read more from NatGeo 

(via scientific-women)

wefuckinglovescience:




This week in science! Extinction: http://bit.ly/1qGs2Rd Genome: http://bit.ly/1tQFfVh Beef: http://bit.ly/1nwuaYB Crows: http://bit.ly/1o4DIFx Virus: http://bit.ly/1tQFe3q Dinosaurs: http://bit.ly/1oxzgnz Insect: http://bit.ly/1lKsuGr Tyrannosaurs: http://bit.ly/1rrS1YG
zenkitten:

(Reblogging OK with all notes intact)(c) 2013 waraphotohttp://waraphoto.weebly.com

zenkitten:

(Reblogging OK with all notes intact)

(c) 2013 waraphoto

http://waraphoto.weebly.com

(via electricsexdoll)

mindblowingscience:

Children Exposed To Religion Have Difficulty Distinguishing Fact From Fiction, Study Finds

The Huffington Post | By Shadee Ashtari
Young children who are exposed to religion have a hard time differentiating between fact and fiction, according to a new study published in the July issue of Cognitive Science.
Researchers presented 5- and 6-year-old children from both public and parochial schools with three different types of stories — religious, fantastical and realistic –- in an effort to gauge how well they could identify narratives with impossible elements as fictional.
The study found that, of the 66 participants, children who went to church or were enrolled in a parochial school were significantly less able than secular children to identify supernatural elements, such as talking animals, as fictional.
By relating seemingly impossible religious events achieved through divine intervention (e.g., Jesus transforming water into wine) to fictional narratives, religious children would more heavily rely on religion to justify their false categorizations.
“In both studies, [children exposed to religion] were less likely to judge the characters in the fantastical stories as pretend, and in line with this equivocation, they made more appeals to reality and fewer appeals to impossibility than did secular children,” the study concluded.
Refuting previous hypotheses claiming that children are “born believers,” the authors suggest that “religious teaching, especially exposure to miracle stories, leads children to a more generic receptivity toward the impossible, that is, a more wide-ranging acceptance that the impossible can happen in defiance of ordinary causal relations.”
According to 2013-2014 Gallup data, roughly 83 percent of Americans report a religious affiliation, and an even larger group — 86 percent — believe in God.
More than a quarter of Americans, 28 percent, also believe the Bible is the actual word of God and should be taken literally, while another 47 percent say the Bible is the inspired word of God.

mindblowingscience:

Children Exposed To Religion Have Difficulty Distinguishing Fact From Fiction, Study Finds

The Huffington Post | By Shadee Ashtari

Young children who are exposed to religion have a hard time differentiating between fact and fiction, according to a new study published in the July issue of Cognitive Science.

Researchers presented 5- and 6-year-old children from both public and parochial schools with three different types of stories — religious, fantastical and realistic –- in an effort to gauge how well they could identify narratives with impossible elements as fictional.

The study found that, of the 66 participants, children who went to church or were enrolled in a parochial school were significantly less able than secular children to identify supernatural elements, such as talking animals, as fictional.

By relating seemingly impossible religious events achieved through divine intervention (e.g., Jesus transforming water into wine) to fictional narratives, religious children would more heavily rely on religion to justify their false categorizations.

“In both studies, [children exposed to religion] were less likely to judge the characters in the fantastical stories as pretend, and in line with this equivocation, they made more appeals to reality and fewer appeals to impossibility than did secular children,” the study concluded.

Refuting previous hypotheses claiming that children are “born believers,” the authors suggest that “religious teaching, especially exposure to miracle stories, leads children to a more generic receptivity toward the impossible, that is, a more wide-ranging acceptance that the impossible can happen in defiance of ordinary causal relations.”

According to 2013-2014 Gallup data, roughly 83 percent of Americans report a religious affiliation, and an even larger group — 86 percent — believe in God.

More than a quarter of Americans, 28 percent, also believe the Bible is the actual word of God and should be taken literally, while another 47 percent say the Bible is the inspired word of God.

mindblowingscience:

Babies’ brains practice words long before they can speak

Newborn babies arrive as strangers in a strange land. They know nothing of the customs or language of their new mysterious world. Yet astonishingly, with almost no obvious effort, babies learn an entirely new language. Some babies even learn several.
They manage this feat, in part, by tons of behind-the-scenes practice, a new study finds. Babies mentally rehearse the movements required for speech long before they utter a word, scientists reported July 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Babies’ brains practice words long before they can speak

Newborn babies arrive as strangers in a strange land. They know nothing of the customs or language of their new mysterious world. Yet astonishingly, with almost no obvious effort, babies learn an entirely new language. Some babies even learn several.

They manage this feat, in part, by tons of behind-the-scenes practice, a new study finds. Babies mentally rehearse the movements required for speech long before they utter a word, scientists reported July 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Continue Reading.